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This is an attempt at making a good faq for the game of petanque. All questions that are directly related to the game and it's basic rules should be included here. The questions and answers are meant for beginners - so please keep it easy to understand for non-players.

Limits on boules

Posted by: Toni ) at 2000-08-30 12:20:14
Posting has been displayed 508 times

One of our local club members has suggested placing a limit on the weight of boules allowed in play within our club (a smaller range than that allowed by the international rules). One player has been using 750gr; two players have recently purchased 740gr; a fourth player wants to purchase 800gr boules.

There is the opinion among some members that heavier boules present a great, and even unfair advantage over lighter ones. Several boule manufacturers print literature on 'selecting a boule' and the weight issue seems inconsistant. Some suggest that lighter boules (680 - 720gr) are better for competition. Others suggest that lighter boules are better for shooters and heavy boules are better for pointers.

I have two questions:

1) Does any other club place restrictions on any aspects of the game, to be more strict than the international rules? and do these restrictions include boule weight?

2) What is the opinion on weight - heavy vs light - as an unfair advantage?

should you shoot with your last boule ?

Posted by: faq) at 2000-10-29 13:22:37
Posting has been displayed 2016 times

landscape architect

Posted by: Arlette Stein) at 2001-07-03 07:11:41
Posting has been displayed 1778 times

Hi,
As you can see above, I am a Landscape Architect practising in an architectural firm in London.

I am designing the grounds of a company headquarters and we would like to place an area designated to 'Petanque' within the grounds.

I would like to know what the best surface is to install and the size of the area needed.

Could someone please help me with this enquiry? It would be greatly appreciated as despite searching the web, it is very diffucult to fing info. on the surface needed when laying it as new.

Regards,


Arlette

Disturb or move?

Posted by: guy therrien) at 2001-11-29 13:22:59
Posting has been displayed 1499 times

Article 28 If, whilst measuring, one of the players moves the cochonnet or a boule being measured, his or her team loses the point.

If, during a measure, the umpire disturbs or moves the cochonnet or one of the boules ....

What happens if, whilst measuring, one of the players _disturbs_ (not moves)the cochonnet or a boule being measured?

TIA,
Guy

Re:Limits on boules

Posted by: Ray Ager) at 2000-09-01 12:02:46
Posting has been displayed 297 times

Personally, I've never come across any restrictions on competition boule weights. Of course, some events don't allow leisure boules.

I disagree about the weight advantage/disadvantage and think that any such fears are unfounded and usually based on inexperience. It's not unusual for an inexperienced player to think I can't shoot those heavy competition boules with my light leisure boules but if you've tried it a light leisure boule will easily shift an 800g boule.

You could apply a similar (misguided) argument to the size of boules, with either a small or large boule giving you an advantage/disadvantage.

My advice: play to the rules and use whichever size/weight boule you feel comfortable with. Remember - the skill of the player is far more important that the boule used.

Re:Limits on boules

Posted by: Vegar Ness) at 2000-09-11 04:12:14
Posting has been displayed 318 times

If some boule size or weight would give the player an advantage, you bet most of the players would use that kind of boules.

I think you will find that pointers hang to small, heavy boules, and shooters to larger, not so heavy boules.

Alas, you never know if you're going to point or shoot when you play your boules, some times you point twice, sometimes you shoot twice, either you are a pointer or a shooter. Thats why most players tend to go for an average size boule (my advice to new players is : pick boules according to the size of your hand to achieve a good grip) and an average weight.

If some clubs want to force some players to play with other boules in club-competitions than the player wants to use, I guess the result is that the player will perform poorer when representing his/her club, because he/she will not get the same amount of practice with the preferred boules.

Vegar.

Re:Limits on boules

Posted by: Jean-Louis Sorel) at 2000-11-09 06:08:33
Posting has been displayed 257 times

Hello,
I play petanque for 3 years I have play with 6 different set of boules and bilive me when I play against somebody who play with a 800gr boules I am happy because it give me a good chance for doing a carreau. And try to do a tournement in doublette against a shooter who play with 800gr after 7 game he's arm is dead,put in your mind 730gr it is realy heavy and 670gr it is very light










Toni wrote:One of our local club members has suggested placing a limit on the weight of boules allowed in play within our club (a smaller range than that allowed by the international rules). One player has been using 750gr; two players have recently purchased 740gr; a fourth player wants to purchase 800gr boules.

There is the opinion among some members that heavier boules present a great, and even unfair advantage over lighter ones. Several boule manufacturers print literature on 'selecting a boule' and the weight issue seems inconsistant. Some suggest that lighter boules (680 - 720gr) are better for competition. Others suggest that lighter boules are better for shooters and heavy boules are better for pointers.

I have two questions:

1) Does any other club place restrictions on any aspects of the game, to be more strict than the international rules? and do these restrictions include boule weight?

2) What is the opinion on weight - heavy vs light - as an unfair advantage?

Re:landscape architect

Posted by: Ray Ager) at 2001-07-03 13:29:39
Posting has been displayed 1126 times

Dear Arlette,

Suggest you come to Brighton for the day and take a look at our seafront terrain which we've tried to landscape in an authentic Provencal style. We have 2 other terrains in the town so you can get a good idea of surfaces.

I also have copies of the BPA datasheet on building terrains, which I can give you.

I have quite a bit of experience of various French terrains and would be happy to suggest some design features.

Please contact me directly for more information.

Regards,

Ray Ager
ray@gaul.co.uk

should you shoot with your last boule ?

Posted by: Erik Jon-And) at 2001-09-28 07:15:17
Posting has been displayed 1128 times

If the situation requires it, yes. Obviously you have to be more alert to the risks of a missed shot, since you have no chance to repair a mistake.

should you shoot with your last boule ?

Posted by: Xavier Tizon) at 2001-10-01 14:54:58
Posting has been displayed 1200 times

I would be careful on this one. One has to take into account the following parameters (I might forget some):
- How many points do you get if you actually manage with your shot?
- How big is the risk for a contre (the boule you hit removing on its way one of the boules YOU had in the play)?
- What are your shooting skills (percentage of hit, and control over the hitting angle)?

And some other, more indirect questions:
- Will you win the game if you hit? Then the previous considerations will get less credit, and the shot MUST almost be taken.
- What is your percentage at the moment (are you hot :-)?


So do not disregard those who say never shoot the last boule , but remember that a good tactician knows when not to go by the book...

faq wrote:
------------------------------------

should you shoot with your last boule ?

Posted by: Etienne Rijkheer) at 2012-05-16 17:05:17
Posting has been displayed 5038 times

For beginners the dictum is 'never shoot your last boule'.

Sometimes it is absolutely appropriate to shoot your last boule. For example, if you have the point and the opponent is lying second, but you are lying third, fourth,etc., and by shooting you can remove their boule safely (without disturbing the point that you have), then you stand to make more that one point. Obviously.

That's why it is important to keep an eye on what is happening in the game. Go up and have a look at how the boules are lying and make the decision with your team mates. Of course, you need to be a confident shooter too!

This is probably covered under 'tactics'elsewhere.

Re:Re:Limits on boules

Posted by: John Tupper) at 2000-10-01 11:43:36
Posting has been displayed 300 times

Personnally, I believe, it is abuse of power when executive of clubs attempt to implement rules because of their disbelief or dislikes.
I beleive heavy balls are an advantage to the pointer, who can use them, because there are less affected by surface conditions and that the lighter balls are more of an advantage to shooters who which to obtain the distance shots.

When I started to use the Jack-Takeout rules to gain points at the endgame, I had the same problem with the local club. We don't play that way here..

International rules are there for the harmony of all. Try telling the executive to have fun and be less serious.

should you shoot with your last boule ?

Posted by: Keith Sloan) at 2001-10-02 04:53:58
Posting has been displayed 1158 times

Being new to the sport just one season, the
question and the answers see FAR TOO simplified.

When you say last boule the questions that come to my mind are

1) Are you holding i.e. the opposition have used up all their boule

1a) If yes can you promote some extra boule by taking out one of your opponents? how risky is such a shot? How many extra points would you gain? Maybe better not to take any risks and ensure you control the distance of the next end.

2) If you are not holding how many boule do the opposition have in hand? Okay your not holdng, but how good is your best boule(s). You want to be able to restrict the oppositions score and risking a shot means you have probably got to carreau. Maybe better to point and hope they don't out point or shoot your best efforts. In our new club we refer to these shots as DL's Damage Limitation . ( Not sure if there is a good French term for such shots). The worst thing you can do is leave the coche wide open for the opponents to roll in a hat full. But if you aleady have a number of DL's then maybe a shot to take out an opponent sitting on the coche could be risked.

3) If the opposition are already holding enough boule to win the game and they are close to the coche. What have you got to loose, there is no point in playing safe
Its your last chance.

4) Also remember if you take the coche out ( out of bounds ) and the opposition have boule left and you do not, then they score the number of boule they have in hand.

So whilst I would agree that a lot of situations you are likely to better off not shooting with your last boule, it does not seem to be a cast iron rule to me and I am only a begineer

Multiple Postings

Posted by: Keith Sloan) at 2001-10-02 06:27:52
Posting has been displayed 1101 times


Sorry about the multiple postings. I kept
getting errors back which indicated my postinghad field

should you shoot with your last boule ?

Posted by: Ray Ager) at 2001-10-02 10:54:46
Posting has been displayed 1154 times

I think Keith is absolutely right to make the points he does. Don't shoot with your last boule should just be taken as a rule of thumb but each situation needs to be carefully evaluated before playing.

I think it's equally true to say that you often need to just as careful when pointing with your last boule - you can easily knock a boule or the coche, giving points away to the opponents.


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